.

Documentary Takes On Girl-on-Girl Combat

A film about real-life high school "mean girls" brings out crowds to the Regency Theatre.

In the midst of tough economic times for families nationwide, it may be easy to let some problems slip under your radar. However, Finding Kind, a documentary born out of  a movement called the Kind Campaign, seeks to address a problem that plagues female youth of America: the hate and isolation that destroys whatever camaraderie these girls build.

A Guy's View

Being male, I was somewhat oblivious as to just how vicious women can be to each other. Never has another group of men ever said anything that has brought me to tears or given me suicidal thoughts. Yet these things are part of daily life for these young women.

It is eye-opening to follow the well-spoken Lauren Parsekian and Molly Stroud as they embark on their cross-country Kind Campaign, which preaches to girls on campuses throughout various states the importance of respect and compassion for one another.

Parsekian and Stroud speak from experience when they say that words can hurt. A shocking statistic from the film is that 100 percent of girls have been affected by something another girl has said. I was disturbed to hear such a stat. Thankfully, the girls are out to stop the bleeding by helping mend relationships and let other girls let out their regrets over the times that they've wronged others.

I liked how the girls take part in what they call the "Truth Booth," in which girls let out any event that they feel horribly about. They also hand out apology cards. These are the tools that allow the Kind Campaign to help stop the suffering endured by so many young souls.

This is not a recent problem. The film dips into history to find that girls have held onto this animosity toward each other. Their mothers testify that they have done both their share of bullying and sitting alone in a room in tears.

I had the chance to be at the premiere of the film, in which stars Parsekian and Stroud answered a few questions afterward.

The premiere "was amazing," said Parsekian.  "I'm from Orange County originally, and we just got back from a two-month-long tour, so I was really happy to bring it home. We've been getting lots of supportive e-mails from people in the community, excited to get involved and bring Kind Campaign and the film to their schools."

I feel that the filmmakers brought a lot of passion and heart to this great documentary. The film is sure to strike a chord as it taps deep into your emotions, both of sorrow and glee.

The film is a short yet fulfilling 77 minutes, and I recommend it, especially to those who have daughters or loved ones who have been ailing over the crude acts of others. Men, have no fear: This film will not threaten your masculinity; it will help you understand your female neighbors. It has yet to hit the theaters, but the filmmakers have been making deals to get it out there, so be sure you keep a lookout for this one at the theater and on television.

Frankie says: out of 5 Patches, 4 Patches  




Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something